Fairy Tales

Shooting Stars

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So many, many thanks to Christine for allowing me to share her lovely story, The Shooting Stars, with my blog readers. The twins and I loved this story. You can purchase the story here. Christine is also currently working with Natalya Yeshchenko on absolutely gorgeous watercolor illustrations, two of which I’ve included in this post.

Shooting Stars

Once upon a time, at the very end of summer, three little stars looked down upon the earth and they became very distressed, for a change was taking place below them.

The Falling Stars

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As I’ve shared here before, Star Money or The Falling Stars by the Brothers Grimm is one of my all-time favorite fairy tales. I think much of it has to do with the fact that, when I was a child, I came across Eugen Sopko’s beautifully illustrated picture book The Falling Stars at the Lancaster County Library’s Children’s Room.

The Falling Stars

But just in case you can’t get your hands on the picture book, I’ll share the story here as well. It’s short, but lovely.


Source: ImaginationKids on Etsy

Once upon a time…

Every child knows those words as the cue to a wonderful story. Most of the stories end with happily ever after, but not this week’s tale. Semsi Mountain is one the Brothers Grimm’s lesser known works. It is a bit morally ambiguous—is it really OK to steal something that was stolen in the first place?— but it’s a great cautionary tale on the dangers of greed. This is my own retelling, but you can read the original here.

Once upon a time…

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I found a sweet little Chippewa story called “The Meadow Dandlion,” which you can read here.

Chalkboard drawing from chalkboarddrawing.org

This would be a fun story to tell as a table play. Make a little Native American puppet for Shawondasee, and use a white or grey play silk for the wind. Have a green playsilk for the meadow, and two dandelions, one yellow and one white, but cutting many thin strips of felt about an inch-and-a-half long, and joining them together in the center with a pipe cleaner.  These would be a lovely addition to your summer table as well!

This week we are telling a folk tale from Japan called The Moon Princess. You can read it here
http://www.topics-mag.com/folk-tales/folktale-beauty-japan.htm

Make a moon princess kimono and sash
Decorate the edges of an old bathrobe with glitter, pretend gems, or glow-in-the-dark stars.
Make a sash by folding a 1-yard piece of shiny fabric in half lengthwise, shine side in. Stitch along the long side and one short side, and then turn inside out. Fold under the unstitched ends, iron, and sew closed. Put the sash over the bathrobe and tie in the back.

Eat Moon Cakes (rice cakes). They are extra yummy with peanut butter!

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If you want your children to be brilliant, tell them fairy tales.
If you want them to be very brilliant, tell them even more fairy tales.
Albert Einstein

Katie Grace is totally into Grimm’s Fairy Tales lately. I have a huge paperback that has them all, no illustrations, and it’s her first pick at story time, every time.

We’re running into a couple issues, though.

One: While I completely get the whole archetypal deal, I’m utterly uncomfortable identifying the villain as a “Jew” or other stereotypical bad guy. So there’s some quick thinking involved to change things around.