Maundy Thursday: The basin and the towel

feet 1

In an upstairs room, a parable
Is just about to come alive.
And while they bicker about who’s best,
With a painful glance, He’ll silently rise.
Their Savior Servant must show them how
Through the will of the water
And the tenderness of the towel.

In any ordinary place,
On any ordinary day,
The parable can live again
When one will kneel and one will yield.
Our Savior Servant must show us how
Through the will of the water
And the tenderness of the towel.

And the call is to community,
The impoverished power that sets the soul free.
In humility, to take the vow,
that day after day we must take up the basin and the towel.

And the space between ourselves sometimes
Is more than the distance between the stars.
By the fragile bridge of the Servant’s bow
We take up the basin and the towel.

After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, “Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord—and you are right, for that is what I am. So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you. Very truly, I tell you, servants are not greater than their master, nor are messengers greater than the one who sent them. If you know these things, you are blessed if you do them.