books

Last Week's Book Basket

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Whoops! Forgot all about the autumn creatures last week, so here we go!

Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper
We just bought this one at Barnes and Noble, and the twins love the adventures of Duck, Cat, and Squirrel. They were disappointed it didn’t include a recipe for pumpkin soup! Do you have one?
You can hear the store read here in a lovely accent.

Yonie Wondernose by Marguerite de AngeliĀ  yonie
This is a Caldecott Honor Book and the twins are fascinated by the “medal” on the cover. I always like to point it out to them, telling them that the illustrations in this book are sooooo wonderful that it won an award. That always gets their attention!

Books about leaves

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I started noticing how climate change was affecting our area a few years ago. Some trees started losing their leaves and they began falling in August, and others held on to their leaves forever. And it’s several weeks into October and I’m only just now taking the air conditioners out of the windows, but I’ve had to turn the heat on as well. There doesn’t seem to be a whole lot of in-between, open the windows, jacket weather anymore. I planned on this being leaf week, but it’s hard to find pretty colored leaves, at least near our house. They’re either dead already or still green. Luckily there are some days off school this week, so we may have to go leaf hunting.

The Apple Cake

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Books and applesWe’ve been starting off our book times with a little apple rhyme. Fingerplays are brilliant because they engage everyone from itty bitty babies who love to watch your hands move and listen to the rhyme and cadence of your voice, to toddlers who can begin to imitate and thus engage in the drama of the moment, to preschoolers and kindergarteners, who have a hang of the rhyme and rhythm of the whole thing and enjoy presenting it in its entirety as experts.

In *My* Book Basket

(And by “book basket,” I mean “big pile of books next to my bed,” LOL!)

This is what I’m reading right now:

books

The Whole-Brain Child: 12 revolutionary strategies to nurture your child’s developing mind by Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., and Tina Payne Bryson, Ph. D.
This book combines my love of the theoretical and the practical, as well as taking a holistic approach to both brain and emotional development. I’m also a sucker for 12 easy steps. I found this in the Little Free Library outside the twins’ school and have found it super helpful in my dealings with all my kids.

Provocations: What are they?

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For a long time, I have praised the merits of taking a few moments to create small-scale play set-ups for your child to discover in the morning or when they come home from school. But it wasn’t until I began my work in a Reggio Emilia-inspired preschool program that I found a word for what these are– provocations.

What is a provocation? Well, at its most basic level, a provocation provokes further learning. A provocation sets up a child for inquiry or learning. The best provocations– indeed, in Reggio philosophies, all provocations– begin by exploring the questions, wonderings, and interests of the children. As you observe how your child interacts with the materials and provocation, you can document learning and further questions, creating a spiral of provocations that continues for as long as your child shows interest.